Abstract

They rained down furiously, splashing, streaking, smearing. They left trails, thick, slowly began to blend together in attempts to dominate, their shrieks immortalized in red and black. They wailed with harsh strokes, edges sharp and biting. And they sang with long breaths of yellows and greens.

Louder they surged upwards, outwards, so keen, so eager to express what even words cannot say. Look at us, they cried with glistening tears of the softest blues. Their arms swept wide, flashing wildly for all to see, to take notice.

They beamed as eyes fell upon them, as eyes listened to their voices, seeing what was not there, hearing what was not said. When eyes gleamed with emotion, they soothed with soft pinks and smiles of white.

And when the brush ceased and left them forever, they stood strong upon the canvas that they had forever claimed. They launched themselves forward into the world. Young and ageless and ready to face the world’s sorrows.

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16 thoughts on “Abstract

  1. Pingback: In Defense of Cynicism | Frequently Awkward

  2. In the sun and in the rain, that’s how it all happened. For the first time, they shared a glimpse into the wonderful world of love and life. It’s all too fast and too soon. How romantic and classic! So Valentine!

    I’ve never read a sex scene so subtle, so surreal, so spiritual, so clean and so abstract that I can’t be too sure if I am right with my interpretation at this moment. It’s yet another masterpiece in the series of the Changeling Child.

    Don’t you think your story is a bit too old-fashioned? It’s enjoyable though, because the suspense is still fairly good.

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    • Thanks for the comment.

      This piece is not actually part of the Changeling Child series. It is also not a sex scene, nor is it a romantic piece.

      ‘rained down’ is not meant to be taken as literal rain.

      It is an artist’s process of painting.

      I hope this clarifies any misinterpretations.

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      • Ok, I got it. How about facing this world’s sorrows though? The last sentence seemed a bit too revealing about the child’s future. Anyways. If I am wrong, I am wrong. Thank you for the clarifications either way.

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      • Don’t worry. I am not angry at all. It’s just that I am not convinced. But, you don’t have to convince me anyway. Given that you post very frequently, I’ll just wait and see.

        Like

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